Rehearsal 4-28-12

Today we embarked on a new work/project entitled A Correct Likeness, exploring the intersection of still photography and dance. The title comes from the need for early painters to render an accurate “likeness,” of faces or landscapes or historical events, as a marker of their artistic success. Prior to the invention of photography (and strangely for a while there after) artists were charged with the task of recording people and events, blending fact with fiction in order to represent things strategically but recognizably.

And well, it just doesn’t seem right to be without a camera recording our rehearsal process as we go. The pictures offer a chance to reflect on the material (the choreographed steps) through a pairing of these two mediums – dance and photography. There are more photos on our facebook page and we would love feedback.

What do you see? What don’t you see? Who do you see and who don’t you see? What feels true about the photograph?

Dates and details on upcoming performances to come!

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You Look Really Familiar

You Look Really Familiar

I’m working on a series of solo performance pieces as part of “Performance Sensorium.” Huh? Well, it’s a bunch of PhDs in Theatre and Performance Studies who are reading theory about the five senses and then, in response, devising performance instead of writing papers. It’s both terrifying and liberating to be out front behind the computer.

This picture is from my piece on vision/visibility, You Look Really Familiar.

You Look Really Familiar is a choreographic exercise in recognizing and remembering previous lived experiences, embodied movement experiences. To highlight the terribly effective distortions of time and self-perception, I videotaped myself simply moving – bare body, bare room and no sound. The video serves as a record of a past self and a tool to reconstruct this past in the present, inevitably illuminating the impossibility of the task at hand. The performance asks me to re-create the danced experience live, in front of an audience and in front of her original (now digital) self. The audience will grapple with the challenges of layered time and layered visibility of the body. Does clothing obscure the body? Does the body obscure the dancing? What is seen definitively and what is imagined? The simple doubling of this body, changed by time (time spent learning the steps that originally occurred spontaneously and without premeditation) and circumstance (the context of the live audience inevitably plays a role in the second incarnation, clothed and inevitably nervous), complicates the opportunity for simply viewing. You Look Really Familiar speaks to a repeated past and the passage of time made visible through that strained repetition.

There are a couple of more photos on our facebook page by the incredible Matthew Gregory Hollis. Next up, sound. Warning…there will be kazoos.

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